I have been told that I have sticky or clumpy platelets what exactly is this, and what causes it?

I have gone through breast cancer had a mastectomy in 03/2010 and finished chemo in 10/2010. I did end up also getting celluitis ( in my breast w/ the expander in it) between these to dates.

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PaulHendrieMDPhD (Physician - Oncology - Hematology/Oncology (Verified) ) - 09 / 12 / 2012

The terms sticky platelets or clumpy platelets can be used in a variety of conditions, but most commonly they refer to the platelets that stick together or form clumps after they are removed from the body.

This can result falsely low platelet counts from automated cell counters. It is usually caused by a protein the binds to a surface of the platelets only when the platelets are in EDTA, the common stabilizing solution in the test tube. Sometimes blood can be drawn in citrate to correct this problem. The platelets are not clumped in the body, so they do not cause any harm.
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